lino.utils.ranges

The lino.utils.ranges module contains utility methods for working with "ranges".

This docstring is part of the Lino test suite. To test only this module, run:

$ python setup.py test -s tests.UtilsTests.test_ranges

A range is basically a tuple of two values a and b, called also limits, who indicate the start and the end of the range.

An open range is a range that has at least one limit set to None.

(This module's source code is available here.)

Functions

constrain(value, lowest, highest)

Test whether value is within the range (highest, lowest).

encompass(a, b)

Test whether range a encompasses (is wider than) range b.

isrange(a, b)

Return True if the passed tuple (a,b) is a valid range (that is, a may not be greater than b).

overlap(a1, a2, b1, b2)

Test whether two value ranges overlap.

overlap2(a, b)

Same as overlap() but with different signature.

lino.utils.ranges.constrain(value, lowest, highest)

Test whether value is within the range (highest, lowest). Return value if it is inside the range, otherwise return highest if the value is above the range or lowest it the value is below the range.

>>> constrain(-1, 2, 5)
2
>>> constrain(1, 2, 5)
2
>>> constrain(0, 2, 5)
2
>>> constrain(2, 2, 5)
2
>>> constrain(3, 2, 5)
3
>>> constrain(5, 2, 5)
5
>>> constrain(6, 2, 5)
5
>>> constrain(10, 2, 5)
5
lino.utils.ranges.encompass(a, b)

Test whether range a encompasses (is wider than) range b.

>>> encompass((1, 4), (2, 3))
True
>>> encompass((1, 3), (2, 4))
False
>>> encompass((None, None), (1, 4))
True
>>> encompass((1, None), (1, 4))
True
>>> encompass((2, None), (1, None))
False
>>> encompass((1, None), (2, None))
True
>>> encompass((1, 4), (1, 4))
True
>>> encompass((1, 2), (1, None))
False
lino.utils.ranges.isrange(a, b)

Return True if the passed tuple (a,b) is a valid range (that is, a may not be greater than b).

lino.utils.ranges.overlap2(a, b)

Same as overlap() but with different signature.

lino.utils.ranges.overlap(a1, a2, b1, b2)

Test whether two value ranges overlap.

This function is typically used with date values, but it also works with integers or other comparable values. The following examples use integer values to be more readable.

Unlike the test presented at <http://bytes.com/topic/python/answers/457949-determing-whether-two-ranges-overlap>, this works also with "open" ranges (the open end being indicated by a None value).

Types of constellations:

-   o---o  o---o
-   o---o  o--->
-   <---o  o---o
-   <---o  o--->
          
-   o------------->
          o---o
          
-   o---o
      o---o
          
-   o---o
      o--->
-   <---------o
         o---o
>>> overlap(1,2,3,4)
False
>>> overlap(3,4,1,2)
False
>>> overlap(1,3,2,4)
True
>>> overlap(2,4,1,3)
True
>>> overlap(1,4,2,3)
True
>>> overlap(2,3,1,4)
True
>>> overlap(1,None,3,4)
True
>>> overlap(3,4,1,None)
True
>>> overlap(1,2,3,None)
False
>>> overlap(3,None,1,2)
False
>>> overlap(None,2,3,None)
False
>>> overlap(3,None,None,2)
False
>>> overlap(1,3,2,None)
True

Ranges that "only touch" each other are not considered overlapping:

>>> overlap(1,2,2,3)
False
>>> overlap(2,3,1,2)
False